Silverado
Great day on the set with the Hawks.

Great day on the set with the Hawks.

mbproject:

Every other Wednesday, the TMBP team meets to plan activities related to the residency project, such as Mark’s February visit, and to discuss the project’s overall development. MCA staff members from five departments come together to share ideas, observations, and insights about our connections to…

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Renee Alvarez, a senior at Lindblom, has received stacks of colorful mail from colleges all over the country. Rather than toss it, she stuffed the mail in a drawer, and is now creating an elaborate dress with it. “I am ripping and folding paper over and over and then sewing these shapes…

Who doesn’t love Claus Oldenburg? Never mind, I don’t wanna know. I’m a huge fan and have always been. First work of his I saw when I was about 12 or 13 I’m guessing. A three-way plug on the lawn of the St. Louis Art Museum. Wonder if it’s coming back ever? I haven’t seen it in years. Living in Chicago, every time I see his Bat Column, it’s a thrill.
When my 12-year old son and I saw this at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden in Washington DC a few weeks ago, I had to explain to him just what the heck this thing is. Indeed, an item that was revolutionary for its time but has now been lost to our digital age. The ultra-utilitarian typewriter eraser!
Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen American, born 1929, Sweden / American, born 1942, The NetherlandsTypewriter Eraser, Scale X, 1999 stainless steel and cement Gift of The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation 1998.150.1

Who doesn’t love Claus Oldenburg? Never mind, I don’t wanna know. I’m a huge fan and have always been. First work of his I saw when I was about 12 or 13 I’m guessing. A three-way plug on the lawn of the St. Louis Art Museum. Wonder if it’s coming back ever? I haven’t seen it in years. Living in Chicago, every time I see his Bat Column, it’s a thrill.


When my 12-year old son and I saw this at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden in Washington DC a few weeks ago, I had to explain to him just what the heck this thing is. Indeed, an item that was revolutionary for its time but has now been lost to our digital age. The ultra-utilitarian typewriter eraser!


Claes Oldenburg
and Coosje van Bruggen

American, born 1929, Sweden / American, born 1942, The Netherlands
Typewriter Eraser, Scale X, 1999
stainless steel and cement
Gift of The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation 1998.150.1

Marcel Duchamp had Joseph Cornell create this box as a portfolio.

Marcel Duchamp had Joseph Cornell create this box as a portfolio.

Interview with Dennis Manarchy

“Photography has gone to hell,” laments Dennis Manarchy. As a professional photographer who has been working with A-list clients since the 70s, he’s well aware of the trends and technology that have influenced photography over the past five decades. “Technology is great, but it’s ruined photography because there’s no credibility anymore,” he states. As artists and photographers adopt innovations of the 21st century, Manarchy holds a keen interest in honoring the medium of traditional film-based photography.

On a recent visit to Manarchy’s impeccable, imposing studio in an industrial section of the neighborhood loosely defined as River West, Dennis and I sat down over coffee and croissants to talk about “Vanishing Cultures: An American Portrait,” his current project. In a large kitchen with an oversized dark wooden table that gives the place the cozy feeling of a farmhouse, there stood two enormous black-and-white prints. The face of a stately elderly man looms out at us. He looks to be in his 80s, maybe even 90. He’s wearing a military jacket adorned with stars and bars. The print is four and a half by six feet, so large that each eye is larger than a baseball. The negative, equally enormous, hangs on a C-stand in front of a glass block window. This portrait is one of thirty-five that Manarchy has made so far for this series.

“There are several events that are coming to a confluence in the next couple of years: the 200th anniversary of the camera, the end of film, and our vanishing cultures,” Manarchy explains. “Some of the cultures are obvious, like the age-related [groups that are] vanishing, like the World War II heroes.” Manarchy relates the story behind the proud, elderly face that is a quiet yet strong presence in the kitchen with us. “This guy right here was a Triple Ace; he shot down 28 planes it was total, in the Second World War. He was finally shot down himself and the Nazis executed him. He woke up from his coma in a pile of dead bodies while a grave robber was going through his stuff, and then they re-captured him and sent him to a hospital-prison type of thing, and there was a Jewish doctor who was in secret that found out they were going to execute him again, so he helped him escape. Now that’s one man, one story. Isn’t that inspiring?”

Yes, it is inspiring. The power of the large visual and the details of the heroic story make a captivating combination. It’s clear Manarchy is driven by his moments of connection with his subjects and wants to participate in the storytelling. “The faces are so fabulous, you know, and their stories are tremendous. Here’s a chance for us to take a snapshot of our country before it’s too late, because at some point, everything will be the same, everybody will be wearing the same stuff, everybody will be eating the same food,” he predicts. While this robotic level of homogenization is hard to picture in a city like Chicago with its strong ethnic neighborhoods, it’s true that clothing and food brands are becoming omnipresent. “We just [photographed] an Ogallala Sioux Indian Grass Dancer who happens to be a checkout guy at Wal-Mart, for his day job, that’s the reality of it.” As much as elders want to hang on to traditions and pass them down to the next generation, the youth want to assimilate, as they always have. “Here’s a chance for us to collect what arguably would be cultures that probably will not be around in 10 years,” he points out.

“Vanishing Cultures” is a big concept with multiple aspects that Manarchy wants to bring forth. When asked about his original inspiration, he explained his fascination with the paintings of Chuck Close: “As a photographer, I was never able to achieve the photo-realism at the size [Chuck’s images] were. Each eyelash was a stroke. It wasn’t broken up into pixels or grain. We weren’t able to achieve that with a little negative, a couple of inches. I experimented and finally got to a size that gave me that photo-realism.”

Massive prints, the equivalent of two stories, will be made from window-sized negatives that are exposed in a room-sized camera. (The 35-foot camera/room has a standard door on the front – just turn the doorknob and enter.) The camera will travel across the country on a flatbed truck. Manarchy wants this project “to allow me to interact honestly with people. It’s not something that’s tweaked and art directed and retouched and so forth.” His vision for the “ultimate manifestation” of the project is an exhibition of pure, unretouched, black-and-white portraits standing tall along the Reflective Pool at the Washington DC Mall. “It’ll be a Cirque du Soleil kind of thing coming in, it’ll unfold, and 30 prints will be up there. There will be a band shell for cultural music, the camera will be there, [with] all kinds of culture within the exhibit.”

“This is the swan song of film,” Manarchy believes. While he has adopted digital image making into his professional practice, he also acknowledges its shortcomings: “Digital is great. There’s nothing wrong with it, [but] all of the software that keeps getting invented makes it look less like pictures.” Because of that, he claims, “Nobody trusts it.”

After our talk and a quick tour of the studio, I came face to gorgeous face with a 12-foot high portrait of a young girl. The appeal of this larger-than-life image is mesmerizing. There is a sense of hyper-real because of the fine, clear detail in each eyelash and skin pore. “Nobody believes any pictures anymore,” Manarchy emphasized. I think he’s right, but if his “Vanishing Cultures” project is realized, he just may change that.


Written by Mia Wicklund 4.5.12

Hmmm, not sure how I missed this earlier this week, but better late than never.

camerastuffs:

Dennis Manarchy’s Vanishing Cultures Project

Over the last 10 years, Dennis Manarchy has built a 35 foot long FILM camera (not the usual wet/dry plate expected at those sizes) that uses 4.5 foot by 6 foot negatives, allowing for astonishing prints that can easily reach and go beyond the top of two story high buildings.
Vanishing Cultures, a 20,000 mile project to capture the beauty and uniqueness of the human race in as many ways as it can, is currently in the funding stage to build the camera proper (and with everyone’s help, hopefully it’ll succeed!)

“Two days of preparation results in 1/1000th of a second flash exposure and I have only one chance to get it right.  I literally focus half-way down an eyelash.  If the subject moves, it’s out of focus…if they blink, it’s a disaster…and if their expression is off the portrait suffers.  I must say that the length of time it takes with the subject creates a special bond that I would never want to lose…and that moment is captured in every one of these portraits.” 

—Dennis Manarchy

“Patti Smith: Camera Solo” at the Wadsworth Atheneum is the first American museum show dedicated primarily to Ms. Smith’s photography.

Michael Kliën’s “Choreography for Blackboards,” created with Steve Valk, had its American premiere at the Invisible Dog Art Center.